Who are we?

LegaSea is the public outreach and fundraising arm of the New Zealand Sport Fishing Council.

LegaSea was established in 2012 to help the public understand the issues affecting our marine fisheries and environment and why we need to restore abundance. LegaSea raises funds to help resource the work the Council undertakes to ensure there are enough fish in the water for future generations.

Our 100% commitment

100% of public donations go towards building more abundant fisheries.

All LegaSea’s operating costs are met by commercial partners, sponsors and in-kind private donors. This means we can dedicate all public donations to our core work of advocacy, research and education.

These investments fuel our mission: to build abundant fisheries for both current and future generations of Kiwis.

Our Principles

Latest Updates

Articles / 10 March 2018

Conserving our crayfish

It is encouraging that so many recreational fishers have expressed a strong desire to conserve their crayfish catch in the interests of rebuilding the CRA 2 fishery between Te Arai Point in the north and East Cape. The MPI review of four crayfish management areas is now over and we await the Minister’s decisions that…

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Articles, Media Releases / 16 February 2018

Cameras on boats – a vital step forward

Recreational fishing group LegaSea is calling on Minister of Fisheries Stuart Nash to stand firm against industry pressure to dump the introduction of cameras and electronic monitoring on commercial fishing boats. LegaSea is challenging industry claims that it is engaging in best practice fishing endeavours, and that cameras and other forms of monitoring are not…

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Articles, Media Releases / 5 February 2018

Fisheries review needs to be prioritised

Crayfish stocks are in crisis and recreational fishers are calling for an independent review of the fisheries management system. Currently, crayfish in the CRA2 region (which extends from Pakiri through the Hauraki Gulf to the East Cape) are at an all-time low. The latest official assessment shows that the crayfish population has been in decline…

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Articles / 4 February 2018

Crayfish Crisis: TAKE ACTION

Crayfish may not be everyone’s target species and they’re not particularly attractive compared to a snapper, yet we all benefit from having them in the water doing what they do best. Crayfish are great scavengers, cleaning up reefs and feeding on sea urchins (kina), if they are big enough. Currently, the crayfish stock on the…

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Articles / 24 January 2018

Restoring crayfish abundance must be a priority

“There are none so blind as those who will not see. The most deluded people are those who choose to ignore what they already know”. This quote from John Heywood (1546) nicely sums up where we are at with crayfish management particularly on the northeast coast of the North Island. The CRA 2 fishery from…

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