Who are we?

LegaSea is the public outreach and fundraising arm of the New Zealand Sport Fishing Council.

LegaSea was established in 2012 to help the public understand the issues affecting our marine fisheries and environment and why we need to restore abundance. LegaSea raises funds to help resource the work the Council undertakes to ensure there are enough fish in the water for future generations.

Our 100% commitment

100% of public donations go towards building more abundant fisheries.

All LegaSea’s operating costs are met by commercial partners, sponsors and in-kind private donors. This means we can dedicate all public donations to our core work of advocacy, research and education.

These investments fuel our mission: to build abundant fisheries for both current and future generations of Kiwis.

Our Principles

Latest Updates

Articles / 21 August 2017

Kaitiakitanga means guardianship

Kaitiakitanga means guardianship or management and traditionally it’s applied to conservation efforts. It’s a matter dear to the hearts of the recreational fishing sector as well. We of all people get to see when there’s abundance and plenty for all, and when there’s a desert, a dearth of life in our oceans. No longer is…

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Articles, Media Releases / 8 August 2017

NZ Sport Fishing Council releases recreational fishing Manifesto

A new approach to managing New Zealand’s fisheries is needed The New Zealand Sport Fishing Council has released its Manifesto and calls on New Zealand’s political parties to consider a new approach to setting policy. The Council has consulted with its members over what they want to see in terms of stewardship of New Zealand’s…

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Articles / 1 August 2017

Licencing a smokescreen for real agenda

The New Zealand Initiative, a consultancy that is paid to produce reports of a right wing nature, has produced a report that says recreational fishers need to be licenced because of a massive problem in the fishing sector. There is a massive problem in the fishing sector – recreational fishers are not it. The report’s…

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Articles, Inquiry / 25 July 2017

Cameras not fit for purpose

Another chapter in the series of failures by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) was uncovered in an MPI report. This report suggested that the cameras being installed to monitor commercial fishing activity are not up to the task. The report stated that the cameras were unable to reliably distinguish species and sizes of fish,…

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Articles, Inquiry / 20 July 2017

Ombudsman reveals more deceit

A media storm erupted last year with the release of Glen Simmons’ Catch Reconstruction Report. This report outlined the unprecedented levels of unreported catch to the United Nations by New Zealand Officials and was accompanied by internal Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) reports that revealed knowledge of widespread commercial dumping. MPI’s Director of Fisheries, Dave Turner,…

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